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Bartholomew Roberts, 2, A prize for the plundering

A PRIZE FOR THE PLUNDERING Black Bart, page 2 On a few occasions each year the Portuguese would mass a convoy to take produce from Brazil back to Europe. After a few weeks of aimless sailing off the Brazilian coast one such convoy, forty-two ships, came into view. It had not yet fully configured itself, two men-o-war set to guard it but were dragging their anchors some way behind, no doubt thinking they were safe still close to the coast. Roberts ordered weapons to be concealed and the ship made orderly and inconspicuous....

Bartholomew Roberts, 3, A stolen sloop to Barbados

A stolen sloop to Barbados Black Bart, page 3 There were numerous laws including the banning of some pastimes pirates would normally take for granted. For instance, anyone caught stealing from the ship would be marooned, no gambling with cards or dice, and no drinking alcohol below deck after eight in the evening. No children or women were allowed on board; further to this if a man smuggled one aboard the penalty was death! Although there was a clause in case they had to rescue random women. In these circumstances a...

Bartholomew Roberts, 4, South to St. Bartholomew

South to Saint Bartholomew Black Bart, page 4 Bart and crew finally arrived at St. Bartholomew in the West Indies where they were given a marvellous welcome. They spent freely and indulged themselves as pirates would, the natives being more than happy to oblige. Here they planned their next adventure, another trip across the Atlantic. Roberts was still on the lookout for a better ship and a few days out of St. Bartholomew he found exactly what he wanted. French ship from Martinique, christening her ‘The Royal Fortune’’...

Bartholomew Roberts, Black Bart from Haverfordwest, West Wales

Bartholomew Roberts Black Bart, the legendary Pirate On the 10th of February 1722, at Cape Lopez in what is now the West African state of Gabon a Captain Challoner Ogle of the Royal Navy engaged and defeated one of the worlds most notorious outlaws, Bartholomew Roberts. Roberts had come a long way from his roots in the little Welsh town of Haverfordwest both figuratively and literally. His journey so far had taken him across the Atlantic from the cool waters of Newfoundland to the blistering equatorial heat he and...

Black Bart, 5, The jackpot, again!

The jackpot, again! Black Bart, page 5 By the end of June 1721 they'd found a small settlement lead by one Jack Crackers, a notorious pirate now retired. Here they traded in 'like company' and made good their vessels. Here he was told of two British men-o-war, 'The Swallow' and the 'Weymouth' that had visited just a month earlier with the intention of returning by the following Christmas. He was well aware of their firepower but felt safe since Christmas was half a year away. Bart's crew didn't leave until that August,...

Black Bart, 6, Ogle scores first success

Ogle scores first success Black Bart, page 6 At dawn on the 5th of February the' Swallow 'came in sight of three ships at Cape Lopez and recognised them straight away. According to the admiralty account, Ogle could not simply drive in an assault because a sand bank blocked his way so he had to steer out to sea for a while. The pirates misinterpreted this as fear, thinking this new comer had gone to run and typically gave chase with the captured French ship, re-named 'The Ranger'. Ogle's lieutenant, a Mr. Sun played...

Sir Henry Morgan (Captain), Llanrumney, Glamorgan

Captain Sir Henry Morgan This, the greatest of all the "brethren of the coast," was a Welshman, born at Llanrumney (probably at Llanrumney Hall, now a pub) in Monmouthshire in the year 1635. The son of a well-to-do farmer, Robert Morgan, he early took to the seafaring life.